Carotid Artery Disease Symptoms

  • Difficulty seeing, blurred vision
  • Loss of balance, difficulty walking
  • Tingling or numbness on one side of the body, face, or appendage
  • Dizziness
  • Confusion
  • Aphasia
  • Severe headache
  • Memory issues
  • Dysphagia

Do You Need Carotid Artery Disease Help?

Carotid artery disease can lead to stroke. This is why the associated symptoms are very similar to those of a stroke. You should immediately contact a doctor if you experience any of these symptoms, even if it's only for a short amount of time. This could be a sign of a transient ischemic attack (TIA) which is the first sign that you might have carotid artery disease. This a diminished flow of blood to your brain, which is temporary.

Medication, lifestyle changes, and occasionally surgery are necessary to treat the condition. For more information of the angioplasty process, click here.

Carotid Artery Disease

Carotid arteries are the arteries that supply the brain with blood. Carotid Artery Disease (CAD) occurs when these major arteries in your neck become narrowed or blocked.

Carotid Artery Disease Symptoms Include:

  • Loss of vision, inability to speak clearly
  • Weakness or numbness on one side of your body
  • Inability to control movement of extremities

 

Carotid Endarterectomy

What does a Carotid Endarterectomy procedure look like?

Carotid Artery Disease can be treated with a procedure called Carotid Endarterectomy in which a surgeon removes the plaque causing blockage of the artery.

The physician first makes an incision on the neck over the diseased artery. Clamps are placed on the carotid artery to restrict blood flow. The artery is opened and a temporary shunt is inserted to keep blood flowing to the brain. The plaque is then removed from the artery. After this, the artery is sewn back together. The original incision is sutured and covered with bandages.

Angioplasty and stunting are procedures that can also be used to treat this disease. Carotid angioplasty involves temporarily inserting a small balloon into the artery. The ballon is inflated when it reaches the blockage to allow blood to flow to the brain. A stent is a small, metal coil. It is inserted into the clogged artery to prop it open. This decreases the chance it will narrow in the future.

Resources
For more detailed information click here: Carotid angioplasty and stenting

Angioplasty and Stents

Angioplasty and stunting are procedures that can also be used to treat this disease. Carotid angioplasty involves temporarily inserting a small balloon into the artery. The ballon is inflated when it reaches the blockage to allow blood to flow to the brain. A stent is a small, metal coil. It is inserted into the clogged artery to prop it open. This decreases the chance it will narrow in the future.

Carotid angioplasty and stenting is less invasive. This means it uses only a small incision. Because of this, it may lead to shorter recovery times. It also avoids the risks of general anesthesia.

Carotid angioplasty and stenting is one option. If you have mild carotid artery stenosis, your doctor may give you medicines to reduce your risk of stroke. If you have more severe blockage, your doctor is more likely to advise a procedure to open the artery. Your doctor is also more likely to recommend a procedure if you have already had a stroke or mini-stroke.

Resources
For more detailed information click here: Carotid angioplasty and stenting

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